Author Interview: Q&A with Sharon Crozier-De Rosa on her book, Shame and the Anti-Feminist Backlash: Britain, Ireland and Australia, 1890-1920

*Thank you to Dr Rosemary Deller, Managing Editor of the LSE Review of Books blog, for conducting such an engaged and astute interview!   In this author interview, we speak to Sharon Crozier-De Rosa about her new book, Shame and the Anti-Feminist Backlash: Britain, Ireland and Australia, 1890-1920, which examines the use of shame as …

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Can Women Share the Honour when Honour has Historically Kept Women Away from Frontline Combat?

On Anzac Day, a day when many of my colleagues will be writing about the crucial issue of the place of indigenous Australians in commemorations of war, I will reflect on another issue, the role of gender in war. In particular, I will look at how emotional regimes, specifically honour codes, have been constructed to …

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Connecting British Anti-Feminism & A Childhood in the Troubles to Write a Transnational History of Gender & Shame

*Growing up in the Troubles, where men were often absent, led me to research women policing women.   *Being a diasporic Irish historian led me to write a book that connects Irish women’s ideas and activisms to those of women across the globe.   In March 2018 my book, Shame and the Anti-Feminist Backlash: Britain, …

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Shame: A Transnational History of Women Policing Women

In this post, I reflect on my latest book, Shame and the Anti-Feminist Backlash: Britain, Ireland and Australia, 1890-1920 (2018, Routledge). From the 1880s to the 1910s, novelist Marie Corelli reigned as ‘Queen of the Bestsellers’, far outselling any fellow authors of her day. As I read through her works to complete my Ph.D. on bestselling fiction and a …

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History and the militant woman

In Britain in 1909, militant suffragist Theresa Garnett publicly whipped politician Winston Churchill with a riding switch saying, ‘Take that, in the name of the insulted women of England’. In an inversion of gendered norms, the male Churchill was reported in the feminist paper, Votes for Women, as pale and afraid, and the female Garnett as …

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Uncomfortable feminist icon: Constance Markievicz

When thinking about writing a post for this ‘Inspirational Women’ series, my thoughts immediately strayed to an uncomfortable feminist icon, Constance Markievicz; a woman who is remembered as much for dividing the Irish feminist and nationalist communities as she is for being a feminist trailblazer. Not surprisingly, Markievicz’s legacy is complex and contested. On the …

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As a peace loving warrior, might Wonder Woman unite feminists?

Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman: she fights better than a man, but prioritises peace. Atlas Entertainment, Cruel & Unusual Films, DC EntertainmentSharon Crozier-De Rosa, University of Wollongong Wonder Woman is a film about a superbly violent woman who uses her physical prowess to help end “the war to end all wars”. She kills countless German soldiers …

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